modern medicine, womb healing

Womb Surgery: Black, White, Or Grey?

Some months back, a good friend of ours, who is a counselor, said to Suraj, “You know, all these surgeries that you doctors perform on the pregnant womb leave a deep scar not just on the body but also on the mind. I really think they ought not to be done.”

Since she was so blunt, Suraj was also equally blunt and asked, “Well, what do you want us to do then? Just allow pregnant women with life-threatening conditions to bleed to death? It’s a question of saving someone’s life or saving their womb. What would you recommend in that situation?”

Our friend smiled and said, “Yes, of course. I’m sorry. I guess I didn’t look at the situation from that perspective. Just wondering how these women can be helped with the repercussions of what they go through.”

“Well, that’s what people like you and Haripriya are here for. So, go ahead and help them!” he said.

“Right. Of course,” she said and laughed.

Recently, I heard about a patient with a medical condition called ‘Placenta Accreta’ where the placenta grows into the wall of the uterus. Under normal circumstances, the placenta detaches from the uterine wall post childbirth. However, this condition causes the placenta to remain attached. After delivery, this can cause severe blood loss and endanger the mother’s life. Very often, surgical removal of the uterus along with the baby is the medical solution to keep the mother safe.

My heart went out to this patient. I felt it must be such a difficult time for her.

From a psychological standpoint, the question that may arise in such a situation is-

Has this woman lost a significant part of herself- her womb?
Many women would say – ‘Yes.’

Could this woman be emotionally distressed by the loss of her womb?
Possibly. The degree of distress may vary from person to person. But some distress is natural.

The other question that usually troubles many is –

Could the surgery have been avoided?
And very often, the answer to that question is ‘Not if you want to save her life.’

Losing an organ is not easy at all. And it can certainly have a negative impact on the psyche.

But, sometimes, surgery seems to be the safest solution for a person, so life can go on.

Over the centuries, millions of women have risked their lives to give birth. In the current time, with hospitals, cesarean sections, bright lights, and high-tech instruments, the process of childbirth may not have a natural feel to it. But there has never been a safer time to give birth either.

One thing I have learned over the years is this –

Situations aren’t always black and white.
Very often, they are grey.

Is surgery on the womb a negative thing to happen to a person?
The answer can never be a simple yes because there are so many factors to consider.

Do difficult unnatural birthing experiences result in the formation of traumatic memories within mother and baby? I don’t know if conventional science would agree. But, as an energy healer, I do believe they can.

But again, it’s about weighing the trauma experienced against the benefit received from the unnatural birthing experience. If there was benefit to mother or baby, it makes sense to feel grateful for the same, while also acknowledging the pain one may have felt along the way. Healing ourselves from the painful aspect of the experience comes next so we can be free to move on.

To achieve a complete understanding, situations have to be seen from different perspectives. And choices have to be made based on what’s best for a person in a given situation. Most people would probably agree that saving a life comes first.

One thing is for certain – it is possible to heal from even the most distressing of situations, including the loss of the womb.

Grief, guilt, shame, and a myriad of distressing emotions may have to be dealt with along the way. But there is a way to heal.

And as long as there is a way, there is hope.
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